“A panoramic examination of women’s changing roles and of women’s efforts to provide for themselves and make their way in the largely male public sphere. Good, timely history for the #MeToo moment.”                   ― Kirkus Reviews

“A meticulously researched and deftly written narrative about the epic struggle between a wronged woman and the powerful man who abused her. Bringing Down the Colonel puts a colorful cast of characters on stage in a gripping courtroom drama that folds in large swaths of American social and political history at a moment of national transition. In many ways, as Miller demonstrates, the monumental case of Pollard v. Breckinridge was an important catalyst for the nascent women’s movement and a precursor of today’s #MeToo phenomenon. An entertaining and informative read.” ―Tom Sancton, author of The Bettencourt Affair: The World’s Richest Woman and the Scandal that Rocked Paris

“History shows how often yesterday’s sex scandal is tomorrow’s sexual revolution. Patricia Miller’s timely and exhilarating book shows how a supposedly ‘fallen’ and ‘ruined’ woman in 1890s Washington shockingly took a powerful man to court to demand reparations. You’ll cheer for the woman who spoke out, brought down the colonel, and struck an early blow against the double sexual standard.” ―Elaine Showalter, Professor Emerita of English, Princeton University

“Polite society deemed Madeline Pollard a ‘ruined woman’ when her long-time lover, Kentucky Congressman William Breckinridge, refused to marry her as promised. Here’s the surprising tale of how she sued and roused a generation of women to throw him out of office.” ―Meryl Gordon, author of Bunny Mellon: The Life of an American Style Legend

Bringing Down the Colonel reads as if it were ripped from today’s headlines. Deeply researched, beautifully written, the story of Madeline Pollard brings alive a period when sexual mores were beginning to change from Victorian to modern. But as Madeline’s story makes all too clear, the more things change, the more they stay the same: vulnerable women and powerful men are not that different more than a century later. Madeline uses her beauty and fierce intelligence to come out ahead, with all of us rooting for her.” ―Kristin Luker, Elizabeth Josselyn Boalt Professor Emerita of Law, University of California-Berkeley